👋🏽

I'm John. I currently live in San Francisco, CA where I lead the design team at Remind.

Previously, I was the principal designer at Clara (acquired by SoFi). Before that, I worked with the Platform and Analytics teams at Salesforce. A long time ago I made a chatting app with some friends.

Remind mobile UI in isometric perspective.

Remind

Remind is a service that connects 27 million teachers, students, and parents a month. It started as a tool that allowed teachers to broadcast one-way texts to students and parents and increase family engagement.

I joined in August 2016 and helped evolve it into a communication and learning platform for schools, districts, and larger education communities. I'm grateful to be part of a mission that's as empowering as it is challenging. Following are some projects I contributed to.

SIS Sync

Since Remind is most effectively used in entire schools and districts, we built a tool that enabled administrators to provision accounts for teachers, students, and parents directly from an external data source, their Student Information Systems (SIS).

Mosaic of UI for Remind's administrator console.

We didn't have a lot of options for administrators to connect to Remind—SFTP was both secure and widely accessible—so we focused on transparency and flexibility for them to have full control over their data.

Self-serve

Mosaic of Remind's billing UI.

In late 2016, Remind made the shift to a SaaS business by allowing schools and districts to purchase Remind. As our lean sales team tackled large districts, we built a self-serve funnel that allowed anyone to purchase Remind for their organization and empowered our marketing team to capture qualified leads.

Phone Calls

Mosaic of Remind's calling feature.

At Remind we try to understand the ways teachers communicate with students and parents and model them in the product. When handling sensitive information, teachers typically begin with a call. Subsequently, we introduced calling on Remind that was private, safe, and captured in conversations.

Leading the team

I'm honored to lead the design team at Remind. It's been a humbling and rich experience. Read more

Leading design

At Remind we try to understand the ways teachers communicate with students and parents and model them in the product. When handling sensitive information, teachers typically begin with a call. Subsequently, we introduced calling on Remind that was private, safe, and captured in conversations.

Isometric image of Clara's loan calculator.

Clara

After the subprime mortgage crisis of 2008, subsequent legislation and oversight made it hard for homebuyers to access capital to finance a home. While this protected buyers from making risky purchases, it also made it arduous to take out a loan. Clara’s immediate goal was to eliminate the inefficiencies in the loan origination process and help homebuyers focus on their goal: acquiring a home.

I joined Clara, then called Expedite, as the first designer to help them build their mortgage purchasing product, the first iteration of which was overly simple. We underestimated the complex dance between the buyer and the nameless handlers behind the scenes who originate the loan: loan officers, processors, and underwriters.

Mosaic of product interface for Clara.

The following iterations were more successful as we developed our sense of how best the user could interface with the product during critical moments. During this time we built a marketing website, stood up a mortgage lending operation, rebranded ourselves, and originated both refinance and purchase loans.

I had left the company before its acquisition by SoFi, but I believe the problem remains unsolved—as evidenced by the explosion of online loan tools from both new players and old. Breakthroughs in finance technology have only just begun; it’s a space I’d like to revisit in the future.

Screenshots and description of the Moment app.

Moment

In 2014 Facebook's newsfeed had become passé and Snapchat was taking the world by storm. Nothing, it seemed, compared to the kind of engagement that happened when people talked to each other in private.

That fall I, along with my friends Cameron and Adam, built a chatting app of our own driven by two interests:
We challenged ourselves to design a network that required no personal information—truly ephemeral chatting.We were also charmed by the larger phones and the idea of half of the screen representing half of the conversation stuck with us.

Mosaic of Moment app UI.

The app ultimately never took off, but we gained some users, chatted with friends, and thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. We built the app on Firebase, gave users GIF-creation abilities, and let users mix and match between photos and goofy text with flattering color combinations.

It was so fun.

The video below has a background track, so mute now if you don't care to hear it.

Screenshots and description of the Moment app.

Salesforce

I joined the Platform team at Salesforce in 2013. At the time, the focus was to enable administrators of Salesforce to do more with less code, so teams embarked on building declarative tools.

Administrators were frustrated with the lack of automation in their ecosystems. The Process Builder was born as a powerful design tool to assemble and deploy business workflows. It was a super-powered IFTTT for Salesforce.

We focused on onboarding and ease-of-use while maintaining a high bar of capability for manipulating data in Salesforce.

Later, I joined the nascent Analytics team to help them make sense of data coming into Salesforce for manipulation and interpretation. One such project I worked on was a CSV uploader.